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In under a decade the way we as a society have come to interpret a collective has changed radically. The widespread proliferation of collective intelligence has not only brought on a renaissance for group-powered thought but also paved the way for a new age of digitally enabled knowledge generation.

The positive reception to this growth has been profound, with think tanks and other thought generation outfits seen across a truly wide span of industries, with more joining the ranks every day.

Of particular interest are the sectors whose means of innovation have been historically unmoving in this regard. They too have felt the driving force of the collective intelligence industry, helping them create sorely needed thought and discourse and then using that momentum to drive future advances. …


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All outfits, including collective intelligence think tanks, must grow and expand over time.

This is a sentiment that’s proven true again and again, as the push for a sense of agency in the world is something that every business seeks to tap into.

To have a greater impact is to make a bigger difference, and to make a bigger difference is to enrich the lives of more people throughout the world. This is the mantra of many collectives who seek to push thought boundaries and create knowledge as a positive process-driven think tank.

Yet a phenomenon also seen throughout the world is the drastically short lifespan of the average collective intelligence outfit, a puzzling situation that warrants further investigation. …


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Collective intelligence has grown up in the digital age.

From its humble roots in crowdsourced ideas and small-scale think tanks, the ability for thousands of people around the world to tackle a single issue is one that’s changing the way that thought and knowledge are generated.

However, the online realm comes with its own set of unique drawbacks, and the one that’s felt the most is without a doubt the complete loss of face-to-face interaction.

Which is why it’s time for the collective intelligence industry to look to the past and create its own specialised physical forum for the good of its future. …


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In under a decade the way we as a society have come to interpret a collective has changed radically. The widespread proliferation of collective intelligence has not only brought on a renaissance for group-powered thought but also paved the way for a new age of digitally enabled knowledge generation.

The positive reception to this growth has been profound, with think tanks and other thought generation outfits seen across a truly wide span of industries, with more joining the ranks every day.

Of particular interest are the sectors whose means of innovation have been historically unmoving in this regard. They too have felt the driving force of the collective intelligence industry, helping them create sorely needed thought and discourse and then using that momentum to drive future advances. …


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Recent discourse in the field of AI-driven collective intelligence has raised an interesting point for consideration. Namely that the maturing of the discipline has brought with it an increasingly narrow gaze in its approach to using artificial intelligence to further its goals.

This is both a valid concern and one that has serious ramifications if it not addressed in any reasonable amount of time.

At first, it may seem odd to pin diversity as a core problem in this field. Indeed, the ‘collective’ within the name collective intelligence implies a distinct opposition to homogeneity.

After all, drawing on a wide range of thoughts, ideas, and expertise is what allows collectives who set out to solve a problem or achieve a goal to thrive and push for real change. …


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The 21st century has brought with it a new age of public connectivity. We now reap the benefits daily of the spread and proliferation of everything from social media platforms to digital knowledge sharing mediums. The ability for people throughout the world to share what they know and have their say in situations that affect us all is both profoundly impactful and something worth celebrating.

However, this rush towards a public future is also seen by many as a rejection of the private groups of our past.

Indeed, it’s no secret that the term ‘private’ has become somewhat of a taboo in the digital age. We often think of private discussion as taking place within shadowy communities. We conjure images of those who work quietly behind the scenes for their own aims or goals to the detriment of others. …


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‘AI-Driven’, it’s a phrase we’ve added to more and more of our lives throughout this past decade. Not just when discussing phones, personal computers and cars, — but thought, theory and conjecture as well.

Regardless of where it has found a home though, the simple fact of the matter is that AI has assimilated with enough systems now to truly be seen as a force for change.

And this populational uptake is why the time has come to open up more of AI development to people from non-tech backgrounds.

The narrative surrounding artificial intelligence is one that reflects much of what we commonly associate with the peak of scientific and technological advance. …


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If there’s one thing that has proven to be in desperately short supply these past few months, it’s leadership.

That’s not to say that those leaders we do have aren’t doing everything they can to forge a path forward that makes the best of this terrible situation.

But rather that there simply aren’t enough thought leaders getting their voice out there and helping to supplement the guidance given by governments and other such authorities.

This is a systemic problem that has reared its ugly head many times in past, however this time it’s different.

Because the means by which the thought leaders spread their knowledge has been placed under threat by COVID-19.


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Hard times are ahead and no amount of staying the course and flattening the curve can change what the future holds for our business sectors throughout the world. We’re in uncharted waters and what comes next is something that can only be left to the most cautious of speculation as we begin to rebuild from this crisis.

To say that jobs have been impacted globally would be perhaps an understatement so large that it rivals the size of the epidemic. Jobs have been lost and more jobs will be lost, that much is clear. …


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Recently I jumped into an interview over on ausbiz TV to speak about the current place of start-ups in the world, and in particular how Mindhive is adapting to the current crisis. During my segment, I mentioned the need for businesses to start fostering ‘sticky’ communities and received a lot of great feedback about highlighting the need to invest in your customers and clients to succeed in what you do as a business.

But what I also received was a number of questions inquiring as to what exactly a sticky community is, and how to build one, so I’ll do my best to explain it in full. …

About

Bruce Muirhead

Mindhive | ex — Eidos, Boilerhouse, Basement, Margaret Marr | Speaker, Author | Bringing the shared economy to problem-solving #collectiveintelligence

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